Commentary

Uni Watch: Pro Bowl's crazy uniforms

Latest color schemes seem pretty flashy but tame compared to past designs

Updated: October 8, 2013, 4:20 PM ET
By Paul Lukas | ESPN.com

The Pro Bowl is the butt of endless jokes, most of which you've probably heard (or told). It isn't even worth trying to remember what the jokes are, because someone will inevitably say, "Why bother making fun of the Pro Bowl? Nobody cares!"

And now there's something new to make fun of: crazy new uniforms, courtesy of the mad scientists at Nike.

Before you get all bent out of shape, it's worth noting that these uniforms are rather tame compared to some previous Pro Bowl designs. Remember the bizarre jerseys from 1994? Or the long pants from 2011?

No, of course you don't remember those, because nobody ever remembers anything about the Pro Bowl. Nobody will remember these new Nike uniforms, either, but they're the designs currently up for our consideration, so let's take a closer look.

As many fans on Twitter have already pointed out, the color schemes look a lot like a matchup between Oregon and Oregon State. The Day-Glo colors should make for some, uh, interesting design combos with some of the players' regular team helmet designs. Interestingly, the color-blocking on the socks has the bright colors on the lower portion, which would be a violation of the NFL's usual uniform rules, but this is the Pro Bowl -- there are no blitzes and no rushing the punter, so why bother to have uniform rules?

In a nice touch, players will have stars indicating their number of Pro Bowl appearances above their nameplates. An even better stat would be the number of Pro Bowls the player opted not to attend because he didn't feel like it, even though he'd been selected, but apparently there's no uniform symbol for that. Maybe they can include that next year -- a new feature (or at least a new joke) to look forward to.

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