NFL sends warning to coaches

Updated: October 27, 2013, 5:33 PM ET
ESPN.com news services

The NFL sent a videotape to all 32 head coaches this week, warning that it will work with officials to pick up more penalties like the controversial one called last Sunday that helped the New York Jets beat the New England Patriots, league sources told ESPN NFL Insider Adam Schefter.

[+] EnlargeChris Jones
Matthew J. Lee/The Boston Globe/Getty ImageA penalty on Chris Jones, middle, gave the Jets new life in an eventual overtime win against the Patriots.

On the video, the league showed two plays from the same game, the sources said.

The first was Patriots defensive tackle Chris Jones pushing a teammate to help block Nick Folk's field goal attempt, prompting an unnecessary roughness penalty that enabled Folk to try what turned out to be a game-winning field goal from 42 yards.

The league also showed Stephen Gostkowski's field goal with 19 seconds remaining in regulation, when New York's Quinton Coples committed the same infraction, according to the sources.

Umpire Tony Michalek, who called the penalty on the Patriots, did not call it on the Jets even though the league admitted in the video that both were rules violations.

Folk was wide left on a 56-yarder, but the miss was negated when Jones was called for the 15-yard penalty that never had before been called in an NFL game.

Referee Jerome Boger explained in a pool report that Jones was called for pushing his teammate "into the opponents' formation." Michalek threw his flag "almost instantaneously as he observed the action," Boger said.

The Jets' sideline alerted the officiating crew to watch for New England's use of the illegal pushing technique, a source told ESPN.com earlier this week.

Publicly, the Jets said very little about the matter. Coach Rex Ryan left little doubt Monday that he knew about the Patriots' practice, and he didn't deny blowing the whistle on them.

ESPN.com Jets reporter Rich Cimini and information from The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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