Concussed Ryan Miller recovering

Updated: July 29, 2013, 11:55 AM ET
ESPN.com news services

Cleveland Browns offensive lineman Ryan Miller returned to the team's training facility on Sunday and began the NFL's concussion protocol after being knocked unconscious during practice.

Miller was rushed to the Cleveland Clinic on Saturday after his frightening injury during a routine blocking drill brought the Browns' indoor workout to a standstill. The 6-foot-7, 320-pounder, who was released from the hospital after a few hours, will be monitored by the medical staff and must pass a series of tests before he can return to the field.

Miller tweeted an update on his recovery to his Twitter followers Sunday night.

Miller was taking part in one-on-one blocking drills inside the team's indoor field house when he dropped after making contact with his helmet. He lay motionless for several minutes, and his teammates huddled around him in prayer as he was immobilized and strapped to a backboard. The Browns initially feared Miller had suffered a devastating injury and were relieved to learn he was responsive and moving his limbs.

Browns linebacker D'Qwell Jackson said the only other time he experienced anything as scary was when former Browns kick returner Josh Cribbs was knocked out last season in Baltimore.

"I've only witnessed it a few times, and any time that happens you just pray and just hope for the best and hope everything is OK," Jackson said. "I'll tell you what, it made everyone realize that at any moment anything can happen."

The Browns drafted Miller in the fifth round out of Colorado last year. He played in eight games as a rookie and is expected to begin this season in a backup role behind Pro Bowl starter Joe Thomas and Mitchell Schwartz.

Cleveland has experience in dealing with concussions. Along with Cribbs, former quarterback Colt McCoy sustained a head injury at Pittsburgh two years ago that prompted the league to change its in-game handling of concussions.

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.

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