Piccioli wins first APAC bracelet

Accumulator event debuts with AU$1 million prize pool

Updated: April 9, 2013, 10:46 AM ET
By Andrew Feldman | ESPN.com

The expansion of the World Series of Poker brand continued this week with the debut of the WSOP Asia Pacific. The five-event tournament series began in Melbourne, Australia with the debut of a new tournament format, the "Accumulator." The 1,100 Australian dollar buy-in ($1,153) offered three starting flights, but unlike most tournaments (where if you make it through the flight you'd wait until Day 2), you could enter each of the flights. Each of your end-of-day stacks would then be combined into one stack on Day 2. A total of 1,085 entries bought in to create an AU$1 million prize pool and New York's Bryan Piccioli outlasted the field to win his first WSOP bracelet and AU$211,575.

[+] EnlargeBryan Piccioli
Shannon Morris for WSOP/Crown CasinoBryan Piccioli won the first bracelet of the World Series of Poker Asia Pacific.

Piccioli entered all three days, but survived only the third and final flight. He ended Day 2 as the chip leader and entered the final table on top, but well aware that defeating a group of nine that included 2010 WSOP main event champion Jonathan Duhamel, Australian superstar Jonathan Karamalikis and 2012 main event final table member Jeremy Ausmus wouldn't be easy. According to the WSOP, eliminations came in spurts during the final table. Ausmus was eliminated in fifth, failing to overcome Jay Loo's A-J with A-7. Duhamel followed him out in fourth shortly after, running his turned two pair into Loo's flopped set.

With three left and Piccioli trying to extend his lead, Karamalikis won some big hands, starting with a tournament-saving 5-5 versus Loo's K-K. As the blinds increased and the race for the top spot tightened, Piccioli eliminated Loo (A-A > Q-J) and he'd hold a $2.0 million to $1.2 million lead to start heads-up play. A 27-hand battle offered Karamalikis supporters some hope, but ultimately Piccioli reigned as his A-8 rivered a straight on a 9-4-5-3-2 board to defeat Karamalikis' 10-10.

"It was a lot of fun [playing against Karamalikis]," said Piccioli to the WSOP. "He is very tough opponent, obviously, and I was hoping I would be heads-up against someone else besides him because I knew it was going to be pretty tough."

Piccioli, who turned 24 two days after his victory, headed to Australia for the Aussie Millions in January and opted to stay in Melbourne, waiting for his chance to play for the bracelet. This was his ninth career WSOP cash, second WSOP final table and largest live tournament score of his career. Online, "theczar19" was once the No. 1 ranked player in the world (according to PocketFives) and has earned more than $5 million with a top cash of $282,245 from an FTOPS event in 2011.

Besides the attendance, which turned out to be stronger than many expected, one of the biggest questions surrounding the event was how much the "Accumulator" aspect would factor into the results. No player was able to accumulate from all three days, but 15 players did manage to survive two starting days, including Ausmus and 2009 November Niner Antoine Saout. In addition to Ausmus, two other members of last year's main event final table, Jesse Sylvia and Russell Thomas, made the money.

Other notable finishers included Saout (13th), Phil Hellmuth (20th), Dan Kelly (28th), Sylvia (32nd), Melanie Weisner (34th), Mike Watson (44th), Thomas (53rd) and Barry Greenstein (75th).

Below are the complete results of WSOP-APAC Event 1:

Event 1: Accumulator no-limit hold 'em
Buy-in: 1,100 Australian Dollars
Entries: 1,085
Prize pool: AU$1,085,000
Players in the money: 90

1. Bryan Piccioli (AU$211,575)
2. Jonathan Karamalikis ($130,743)
3. Junzhong Loo ($96,305)
4. Jonathan Duhamel ($71,870)
5. Jeremy Ausmus ($54,337)
6. Graeme Putt ($41,610)
7. Iori Yogo ($32,268)
8. Peter Kleudgen ($25,335)
9. Ryan Otto ($20,138)
10. Ash Gupta ($16,199)
11. Alek Givotovsky ($16,199)
12. Oliver Gill ($16,199)
13. Antoine Saout ($13,183)
14. Daniel Laidlaw ($13,183)
15. Kale Halstead ($13,183)
16. Homan Houshiar ($10,861)
17. Brandon Shim ($10,861)
18. Frank McColgan ($10,861)
19. Norman Shill ($9,049)
20. Phil Hellmuth ($9,049)
21. Kevin Sharp ($9,049)
22. Dean Blatt ($7,628)
23. Peter Kotsiris ($7,628)
24. Haibo Chu ($7,628)
25. Kasey Robertson ($6,499)
26. Luke Spano ($6,499)
27. Simon Moshi ($6,499)
28. Dan Kelly ($5,599)
29. Christopher Pereira ($5,599)
30. Nick Morales ($5,599)
31. Samer Fakhoury ($4,883)
32. Jesse Sylvia ($4,883)
33. Stevan Chew ($4,883)
34. Melanie Weisner ($4,307)
35. Thang Truong ($4,307)
36. Jackie Glazier ($4,307)
37. Phillip Libeau ($3,841)
38. Dylan Honeyman ($3,841)
39. Tony Kambourglou ($3,841)
40. Sam Cohen ($3,841)
41. Patrick Crivell ($3,841)
42. Dan Levy ($3,841)
43. Sean Lannon ($3,841)
44. Mike Watson ($3,841)
45. Nathan Bevan ($3,841)
46. Paul Hill ($3,461)
47. Jeff Frerichs ($3,461)
48. Leanne Anderson ($3,461)
49. David Brand ($3,461)
50. Karan Punjabi ($3,461)
51. Trevor Saunders ($3,461)
52. Craig Blight ($3,841)
53. Russell Thomas ($3,841)
54. Mufit Brahim ($3,841)
55. Jeremy Simon ($3,147)
56. Eui Woong Kim ($3,147)
57. Ian Aldridge ($3,147)
58. Andrew Hinrichsen ($3,147)
59. David Naughton ($3,147)
60. Arthur McMahon ($3,147)
61. Mile Krstanoski ($3,147)
62. Najib Moubayed ($3,147)
63. Minh Phuc Nguyen ($3,147)
64. Samuel Bernard ($2,897)
65. Josko Markovic ($2,897)
66. Martin Kozlov ($2,897)
67. Roy Hills ($2,897)
68. Tristan Bain ($2,897)
69. Paul Birman ($2,897)
70. Dimitrios Tremmos ($2,897)
71. Quang Ta ($2,897)
72. Beng Hooibeh ($2,897)
73. Craig Ivey ($2,669)
74. Dominic Lindner ($2,669)
75. Barry Greenstein ($2,669)
76. Ivan Zalac ($2,669)
77. Lawrence Hall ($2,669)
78. Jason Lee ($2,669)
79. Dale Rayes ($2,669)
80. Peter Longmore ($2,669)
81. James Hoeppner ($2,669)
82. Sam Goerges ($2,452)
83. Aaron Benton ($2,452)
84. John Dalessandri ($2,452)
85. Luca Borregine ($2,452)
86. Ryan Pigatelli ($2,452)
87. Brad McGarrity ($2,452)
88. Patrick Fletcher ($2,452)
89. Henry Szmeller ($2,452)
90. Andrew Scarf ($2,452)

Andrew Feldman is ESPN.com's Poker Editor. He is the host of the Poker Edge Podcast and co-host of ESPN Inside Deal. Andrew has covered the poker industry for ESPN since 2004.

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