Big problems with the NCAA?

Kentucky coach John Calipari isn't all that pleased with how the NCAA does things. According to a report in The Wall Street Journal, the Wildcats coach in his new book compares college sports' governing body to the last years of the Soviet Union, saying it has failed to change with the times. Calipari also proposes several changes, including allowing players to transfer without sitting out if their coach leaves, a $3,000-to-$5,000 stipend and more. What's your take?

  • What do you make of John Calipari comparing the NCAA to the Soviet Union in its latter years?

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      53%
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      47%

    Discuss (Total votes: 68,267)

  • How do you feel about the way the NCAA treats its athletes?

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      11%
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      37%
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      37%
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      15%

    Discuss (Total votes: 63,866)

  • Should the NCAA seek input from coaches such as John Calipari?

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      72%
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      28%

    Discuss (Total votes: 19,569)

  • Should college athletes be allowed to profit off their own names?

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      78%
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      22%

    Discuss (Total votes: 43,931)

  • Should college athletes be allowed to receive one round-trip flight home a year?

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      85%
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      15%

    Discuss (Total votes: 18,919)

  • What do you make of the $3,000-$5,000 stipend proposed by John Calipari?

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      30%
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      58%
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      12%

    Discuss (Total votes: 18,338)

  • If a coach leaves a program, should players be allowed to transfer without sitting out?

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      86%
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      14%

    Discuss (Total votes: 18,160)

  • What chance do you give the NCAA as a governing body of ceasing to exist in your lifetime?

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      30%
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      48%
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      22%

    Discuss (Total votes: 34,218)

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