It's a rare thing for any NBA star to stay in the NBA for four years anymore -- players like Fab Melo and Jared Sullinger are leaving for the draft after their sophomore years, and it's not at all unusual for players to stay for one year and leave. Mark Cuban thinks this is a bad thing for basketball -- that it'd be better for prospects to wait at least three years after graduating high school before declaring for the draft. They wouldn't have to go to college, as some could opt to take the Brandon Jennings route and play overseas instead. Is Cuban off-base?


Wait or not?

Three years would give players more time to develop, but some might value the ability of a player to decide his own future as soon as he graduates high school.

SportsNation

How long should players have to wait after they finish high school to declare for the NBA draft?

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    8%
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    35%
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    19%
  •  
    8%
  •  
    30%

Discuss (Total votes: 177,174)


Good or bad?

Teams like Kentucky make good use of the one-and-done rule, building up and breaking down their rosters every year.

SportsNation

What do you make of top players going one-and-done in college basketball?

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    11%
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    38%
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    4%
  •  
    47%

Discuss (Total votes: 49,794)


Overseas development?

Brandon Jennings spent his one year of waiting overseas, and it hasn't seemed to hurt his development in any significant way.

SportsNation

Which is a better way for prospects to prepare for the NBA?

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    84%
  •  
    16%

Discuss (Total votes: 88,808)

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