Sports have halls of fame, where all-time greats, innovators and pioneers are honored. Rock and roll has one, too. And what's true for sports is also true for music: There's always difference of opinion over who deserves to be enshrined. Take the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 2014 nominees, for example: First-time candidates like Nirvana and Hall & Oates are deserving of recognition, but what about artists like Chic and LL Cool J who are returning to the ballot? So we want to know: Which artists do you think deserve to be enshrined among rock's all-time greats in Cleveland? Click on the images below to submit your rankings.

Rank: 2014 Rock Hall of Fame nominees

Chic

Chic

Led by guitarist Nile Rodgers, created some of disco's most enduring singles, later heavily sampled in hip-hop. Try: "Good Times," "Le Freak."

Deep Purple

Deep Purple

Guitar and organ-powered heavy metal pioneers; signature "Smoke On The Water" riff is the first one many would-be rock stars learn. Try: "Highway Star," "Lazy."

Peter Gabriel

Peter Gabriel

Enjoyed solo success after leaving Genesis (with whom he is already enshrined). Try: "Solsbury Hill," "Sledgehammer."

Hall & Oates

Hall & Oates

Run of 1970s Philly Soul-styled hits was a prelude to massive chart success with a slicker sound in the early 1980s. Try:"She's Gone," "Maneater."

KISS

KISS

Mixed glam costumes, pop songwriting hooks and hard rock while upping the ante for onstage theatrics. Try: "Rock and Roll All Nite," "Detroit Rock City."

LL Cool J

LL Cool J

A hip-hop pioneer whose career extends back to its 1980s New York City roots, his rhymes and delivery made him one of rap's first and biggest mainstream success stories. Try: "Mama Said Knock You Out," "I'm Bad."

The Meters

The Meters

Influental New Orleans funk and rhythm and blues band that backed Allen Toussaint, worked with Dr. John and Robert Palmer and has been widely sampled in hip-hop. Try: "Cissy Strut."

N.W.A.

N.W.A.

Pioneers of West Coast and gangsta rap whose gritty rhymes about life and death in South Central L.A. changed the game. Try: "Express Yourself," "Gangsta Gangsta."

Nirvana

Nirvana

Grunge rock power trio took America by storm before singer/guitarist Kurt Cobain's suicide. Try: "(Smells Like) Teen Spirit," "Come As You Are."

Butterfield Blues

Butterfield Blues

Chicago's Paul Butterfield Blues Band mixed Chicago blues with rock and jazz influences and played both Monterey and Woodstock. Try: "Born in Chicago," "East-West."

Linda Ronstadt

Linda Ronstadt

Followed up 1970s platinum pop chart successes by tackling opera, standards and Mexican folk songs from her Arizona childhood. Try: "Different Drum," "You're No Good."

Replacements

Replacements

The Replacements weren't a chart success, but they pioneered the alternative sound with a mix of classic rock and punk influences. Try: "I'll Be You," "Can't Hardly Wait."

Cat Stevens

Cat Stevens

Singer-songwriter whose emotional delivery epitomized the confessional folk-rock of the seventies. Try: "Peace Train," "Oh Very Young."

Link Wray

Rock pioneer whose early use of distortion and power chords influenced generations of guitarists. Try: "Rumble."

Yes

Yes

1970s progressive rock icons known for longish songs, technical mastery, lengthy solos and Jon Anderson's impossibly high vocals. Try: "Roundabout," "Starship Trooper."

The Zombies

The Zombies

British Invasion-era band brought sense of mystery to their singles with keyboard-driven sound. Try: "She's Not There," "Time Of The Season."

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