Debate has raged this week over a call late in the Jets' win over the Patriots, where Chris Jones was called for pushing a teammate on a field goal attempt. It's not the first time a new or obscure rule has resulted in a call that changed the outcome of a game -- football is full of such incidents. We've collected 12 of the most heated calls in football history. Which do you think is the most controversial? Mouse over the calls to get the full story, and submit your rankings!

Most controversial NFL calls

The Push

The Push

Patriots vs. Jets, Oct. 20, 2013: Chris Jones shoved teammate Will Svitek on a Jets FG attempt. After a penalty was called, the Jets rekicked and won the game in overtime.


The Fail Mary

The Fail Mary

Seahawks touchdown vs. Packers, Sept. 24, 2012: Golden Tate shoved Sam Shields out of the way, then wrestled with M.D. Jennings for possession. It was ruled a touchdown.


Low Block

Low Block

Super Bowl XL, Seahawks-Steelers, Feb. 5, 2006: Matt Hasselbeck was called for a low block while making a tackle on an interception return.


The Tuck Rule

The Tuck Rule

Patriots vs. Raiders, Jan. 19, 2002: After stopping his passing motion, Tom Brady lowered the ball, was hit and fumbled with Oakland recovering. It was later ruled that ''The Tuck Rule'' applies. Brady's fumble was ruled an incompletion. New England kicked a tying field goal and later won in OT.


The Bert Emanuel Rule

The Bert Emanuel Rule

1999 NFC Championship, Jan. 23, 2000: With the Buccaneers driving at the end of the game, Bert Emanuel made a catch that was overturned on replay, although he controlled the ball while it hit the ground. The call prompted a new rule clarifying a catch.


The Music City Miracle

The Music City Miracle

AFC wild-card game, Jan. 8, 2000: At the end of the game, Frank Wycheck threw what looked like a forward pass on a kickoff return that Kevin Dyson took 75 yards for the winning TD.


The Coin Flip

The Coin Flip

Steelers vs. Lions, Nov. 26, 1998: Steelers' Jerome Bettis called ''heads'' on the coin flip before overtime of a Thanksgiving Day game against Detroit. The coin turned up heads, but the referee said he heard ''tails.'' The Lions got the ball and won.


The Out-of-Bounds TD

The Out-of-Bounds TD

1980 AFC championship game, Jan. 6, 1980: Mike Renfro caught a TD pass, but he was ruled out of bounds in the days before replay.


The Holy Roller

The Holy Roller

Raiders vs. Chargers, Sept. 10, 1978: Raiders QB Kenny Stabler intentionally fumbled the ball forward, and Raiders recovered in the end zone for the winning TD. The rule regarding fumbles was later changed.


The Immaculate Reception

The Immaculate Reception

AFC Divisional playoff, Dec. 23, 1972: Franco Harris caught deflected pass vs. Raiders and scored TD. Some said it was deflected only by a Steelers player, which would have made Harris' catch illegal.


The Helmet TD

The Helmet TD

Jets vs. Seahawks, Dec. 6, 1998: Vinny Testaverde scored the winning TD in the final minute against Seattle, but replays showed only his helmet crossing the goal line. The call was credited with helping usher in replay.


The Phantom Fumble

The Phantom Fumble

AFC Championship Game, Jan. 1, 1978: Denver's Rob Lytle fumbled at goal line, but refs didn't see it and blew the play dead. Broncos scored a TD and advanced to Super Bowl.


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